Memorial Day

Memorial Day is more than just a three-day weekend and a chance to get the year’s first sunburn.
Memorial Day was a response to the unprecedented carnage of the Civil War, in which some 620,000 soldiers on both sides died. The loss of life and its effect on communities throughout the North and South led to spontaneous commemorations of the dead:
 In 1864, women from Boalsburg, Pennsylvania, put flowers on the graves of their dead from the just-fought Battle of Gettysburg. The next year, a group of women decorated the graves of soldiers buried in a Vicksburg, Mississippi, cemetery.
 In April 1866, women from Columbus, Mississippi, laid flowers on the graves of both Union and Confederate soldiers. It was recognized at the time as an act of healing regional wounds. In the same month, up in Carbondale, Illinois, 219 Civil War veterans marched through town in memory of the fallen to Woodlawn Cemetery, where Union hero Maj. Gen. John A. Logan delivered the principal address. The ceremony gave Carbondale its claim to the first organized, community-wide Memorial Day observance.
Waterloo, New York., began holding an annual community service on May 5, 1866. Although many towns claimed the title, it was Waterloo that won congressional recognition as the “birthplace of Memorial Day.”
Three years after the Civil War ended, on May 5, 1868, the head of the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) established Decoration Day as a time for the nation to decorate the graves of the war dead with flowers. Maj. Gen. John A. Logan declared that Decoration Day should be observed on May 30. This date was chosen because flowers would be in bloom all over the country.
From the practice of decorating graves with flowers, wreaths and flags, the holiday was long known as Decoration Day. The name Memorial Day goes back to 1882, but the older name didn’t disappear until after World War II. Federal law declared “Memorial Day” the official name in 1967.
In 1915, inspired by the poem “In Flanders Fields,” Moina Michael replied with her own poem.

We cherish too, the Poppy red
That grows on fields where valor led,
It seems to signal to the skies
That blood of heroes never dies.

She then came up with an idea of wearing red poppies on Memorial day in honor of those who died serving the nation during war. She was the first to wear one, and sold poppies to her friends and co-workers with the money going to benefit servicemen in need.
Since the late 1950′s on the Thursday just before the Memorial day, around 1200 soldiers of the 3d U.S. Infantry place small American flags at each of the more than 260,000 gravestones at Arlington National Cemetery. They then patrol 24 hours a day during the weekend to ensure that each flag remains standing. In 1951, the Boy Scouts and Cub Scouts of St. Louis began placing flags on the 150,000 graves at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery as an annual Good Turn, a practice that continues to this day.

In 2000, Congress established a National Moment of Remembrance, which asks Americans to pause for one minute at 3 p.m. in an act of national unity. The time was chosen because 3 p.m. “is the time when most Americans are enjoying their freedoms on the national holiday.”

And in 2004, Washington D.C. held its first Memorial Day parade in over 60 years.

Macaroni Sheep

What you need:
• 4″ x 6″ piece of cardboard
• 2 large spring type clothespins
• Elbow macaroni
• 2 wiggle eyes
• White felt
• Paint (black, white and pink)
• White glue
• paintbrush
What you do
• From the cardboard cut one 3-inch circle for the body and one 1 1/2-inch circle for the head.
• Paint the body circle white on both sides.
•  Paint the head circle black on both sides. Let dry.
• Paint top 1/3 of the head white.
• Take the clothespins apart and paint the wooden pieces black. Allow to dry completely and then put back together.
• Attach the clothespins with glue to the body circle.
• Glue elbow macaroni to the front of the body circle and to the top 1/3 of the head circle where it was painted white.
• Paint the macaroni on both pieces white.
• Cut two ears from the white felt and glue to the back of the head.
• Glue two goggle eyes to the front of the head.
• Paint a nose on the face with pink paint.
• Glue head to body. Let dry.

Homemade Bubbles

It’s bubble season at our house. The snow clothes are put away, yet it’s not quite warm enough for the pool, so out come the bubbles. We recently made homemade bubbles, and then found household items to blow the bubbles through.
Bubble Solution
1 cup water
2 tablespoons light karo syrup or 2 tablespoons glycerin
4 tablespoons dishwashing liquid
Mix together.
Fancy Homemade Bubbles
1 cup water
2 tablespoons liquid detergent
1 tablespoon glycerin
1 teaspoon sugar
Mix all ingredients together until sugar dissolves.
• Wire Hangers
Wire hangers can be manipulated (by a safety-conscious adult, of course) into a variety of shapes and sizes.  Just use pliers to straighten the wire first. Then bend a large loop at one end leaving room for a handle.  Close the loop off by wrapping a bit of the end around the handle.  Plastic-coated wire hangers work best for this, though any stiff but flexible wire will work.
• Pipe Cleaners
The principle here is not unlike using a wire hanger, it’s just smaller and fuzzier. That fuzz comes in handy, too, as it helps these little bubble-blowing wonders soak up a lot of soapy solution. Pipe cleaners (also known as chenille stems) are also a lot easier to handle and manipulate than hangers and can be used to satisfy a large number of bubble-blowers at one time. With a little help, toddlers and younger kids can even have a go at making their own bubble wands and can learn from what works and what doesn’t. Since pipe cleaners aren’t expensive and they’re plentiful, kids get many chances to experiment. To make different shapes, use cookie cutters as guides.
• Straws and String
Straws and string make the most beautiful pairing since chocolate and peanut butter. At least for making bubbles, anyway. You need two straws (that serve as handles) and string in a length at least four times that of one of the straws. The string must be thin enough to be threaded through the straws. You can use a longer length to make really huge bubbles but keep in mind that younger kids will probably have a hard time getting the hang of blowing bubbles this way. It’s mostly for adults to make giant, impressive bubbles that kids and dogs can chase and pop in the yard.

Victory Day

Victory Day, marking the defeat of Nazi Germany, is Russia’s most important secular holiday.On this day, TV networks broadcast World War II-inspired films, younger generations honor veterans, and the festivities culminate in a military parade at Moscow’s Red Square.
Victory Day or 9 May marks the capitulation of Nazi Germany to the Soviet Union in the Second World War (also known as the Great Patriotic War in the Soviet Union and all post-Soviet states). It was first inaugurated in the fifteen republics of the Soviet Union, following the signing of the surrender document late in the evening on 8 May 1945 (after midnight, thus on 9 May, by Moscow Time). It happened after the original capitulation that Germany earlier agreed to the joint Allied forces of the Western Front. The Soviet government announced the victory early on 9 May after the signing ceremony in Berlin. Field-Marshal Wilhelm Keitel submitted the capitulation of the Wehrmacht to Marshal Georgy Zhukov in the Soviet Army headquarters in Berlin-Karlshorst. To commemorate the victory in the war, the ceremonial Moscow Victory Parade was held in the Soviet capital on 24 June 1945 (four years and two days after the beginning of Operation Barbarossa – the invasion of the Soviet Union).
The war in Russia was to change the course of World War Two in Europe. In June 1941, World War Two witnessed what was then the largest land attack in history  -‘Operation Barbarossa’. A vast Nazi force used Blitzkrieg to devastating effect on the Russian Army. Hitler had long made it clear that he hated the Russians and that war between the two countries was inevitable. The Nazi-Soviet Pact of 1939 had only delayed what Hitler was apparently planning even when the Battle of Britain was at its height. He believed that the Russians were sub-human (the ‘untermenschen’ ) and that they had no right to live where they did. That they were East European was compounded by the fact that Russia was communist and led by Joseph Stalin. Hitler hated communism and Stalin.
Hitler wanted all the land in Eastern Europe to be given to Germans as they, Hitler believed, could farm it properly while East Europeans could not. Also many Jews lived in Russia (also known as the USSR at this time) and Hitler wanted them exterminated.
In August 1939, Hitler and Russia had signed a treaty of non-aggression which was meant to last for 10 years. However, for both countries the treaty was merely to buy time to get their armies into shape before one attacked the other. Hitler wished to stabilise his western frontier before turning east. Stalin desperately needed to reform his army after the 1930’s putches when his senior officers had been effectively wiped out either by imprisonment or execution.
In June 1941 Operation Barbarossa took place – a massive attack by the Germans on Russia.  
Hitler’s senior commanders had advised that the bulk of the German attack should be concentrated on Moscow. Two smaller armies would target Leningrad and Stalingrad and engage the enemy. These two armies would then be helped by the troops in the main bulk once Moscow had surrendered. They felt that once the heart of the nation had been cut out, the rest of the country would fall. 
Hitler would not have this. He did not believe that the Russian army was a match for the Wehrmacht and decided on three equal forces attacking Moscow, Leningrad and Stalingrad. As always, he got his way. 
The German attack on Russia involved:
3 million soldiers,  
3580 tanks, 
7184 artillery guns, 
1830 planes  
750,000 horses 
The Russian army collapsed under this onslaught and the attack was initially incredibly successful. Moscow was nearly reached, Leningrad was surrounded and the oil fields in the south were swiftly approached. But it had one main failing and that was created by Hitler himself. 
As the Russians pulled back (retreated) they destroyed anything that might be of use to the German army as it advanced – bridges, railways, buildings etc. and poisoned water supplies. This policy was known as “scorched earth” and it was not expected by the Germans and severely hindered their armies. The supply lines of the German army stretched from Germany through Poland and into Russia itself – a huge distance to defend and control. These supply lines were attacked by guerrillas called partisans who did a considerable amount of damage to the German army and caused major shortages.
The winter of 1941-42 was one of the worst in recorded history. Daily temperatures fell to 40 degrees below zero. German soldiers had not been issued with warm winter clothing as Hitler believed that the invasion would be over by the winter. Soldiers froze to death in their sleep, diesel froze in fuel tanks and food was in very short supply. Russian soldiers had been issued with winter clothing and did not suffer as badly as their German enemies.
The defeat of an entire German army at Stalingrad was a disaster for the Germans and some historians consider this battle the turning point of World War Two because the German army could now only go in one direction and that was back to Germany.
However, while the army was fighting the Russian army, soldiers from the SS Einsatzgruppen murdered hundreds of thousands of civilians. This was all part of Hitler’s plan to get rid of ‘sub-humans’ from Europe. It is thought that as many as 26 million Russians died during the war. The slaughter was so great that Himmler believed that the policy of shooting civilians might disturbed those doing the killing. A direct result of this was the order to find a quicker way of murdering the people of Russia and the idea of death factories developed from this which lead to the Holocaust.
However, from a military point of view, the defeat of the Germans by the Russians was vital to the Allies overall victory in Europe. Over two-thirds of the German army was in the Russian war and its defeat meant that the Allies in the west (GB, France and USA) had more chance of success against a smaller force. Winston Churchill stated that it was the Russians who “tore the heart out of the German army.”
What was the war like for the people in Russia and for the German soldiers?
From a German soldier who fought in Russia : 
“Do you know how we behaved to the civilians? We behaved like devils out of Hell. We left those poor villagers to starve to death, thousands and thousands of them. How can you win a war in this way?
We shoot villagers on the slightest excuse. Just stick them up against a wall. We order the whole village out to watch. It’s a vicious circle. We hate them and they hate us, and on and on it goes, everyone getting more inhuman.
The civilians were all ready to look on us as saviors. They had had years of oppression from the communists. What did we do? Turn into slaves under Hitler.
If the Russians should ever pay back one half of what we have done, you won’t smile or sing again.
We were quartered (living) in a house outside the town. Our dwelling for the night was a wooden house occupied by a Russian family of five children and an old grandmother. We were bitten by fleas all night. We opened our tins and made coffee, sharing what we had with the children and the old woman.
The man of the house was a soldier and the mother had been taken away to dig trenches. The children all had protubing bellies of long-term malnutrition. The reality is that after 22 years of Communist rule, a salted fish is the height of luxury. How this country depresses me.”
From a soldier who fought in southern Russia :
“I watched my mother and father die. I knew perfectly well that they were starving. But I wanted their bread more than I wanted them to stay alive. And they knew that. That’s what I remember about the blockade (of Leningrad): that feeling that you wanted your parents to die because you wanted their bread.”
Daily rationing quotas for the people of Leningrad in November 1941:

  Labourer Child of Eight
Bread 252g 128g
Fat 19g 17g
Meat 49g 14g
Cereals 49g 39g
Sugar 49g 39g

Celebration of Victory Day:
Many people attend a local military parade and watch the fireworks at night on Victory Day. The biggest parade is in Moscow’s Red Square, showcasing Russia’s military forces. Most veterans wear their medals as they head to the parade or an event organized by a local veteran organization.
Another tradition is to give flowers, usually red carnations, to veterans in the street and to lay wreaths at the war memorial sites. Neighborhood schools may host a program prepared by the students, featuring wartime songs and poetry.
At home, families gather around a festive table to honor surviving witnesses of World War II and remember those who passed away. They may also watch a favorite Soviet film based on the events of World War II, which is also known as the Great Patriotic War. These films are repeated each year but the audience seems to never grow tired of them.
Public Life
Victory Day is a national holiday in Russia. Public offices, schools and most businesses are closed for the celebrations. There may be changes in public transport routes due to parades and street performances.
Symbols
Common symbols of Victory Day in Russia are:

  • St. George ribbon – people wear this black-and-yellow ribbon on their clothes or tie it to car antennas as a sign of respect and remembrance.
  • Red carnations – blood red is the color of the Soviet flag under which the veterans had fought. Laying an even number of red carnations at war memorial sites signifies mourning and remembrance.
  • Red Star medal – a military distinction for bravery.

Mother’s Day

It is claimed by the Historians that the holiday of Mother’s Day has emerged from the ancient festivals dedicated to mother goddess. In the ancient Greek empire, Rhea, the wife of Cronus, and mother of Gods and Goddesses, was worshipped.
In Rome, Cybele, a mother Goddesses, was worshipped, as early as 250 BC. It was known as Hilaria, and it lasted for three days, called the Ides of March, that is from March 15 to March 18.However, neither of them meant for the honoring of our immediate mothers, as is done in our Mother’s Day.
“Mothering Sunday” is the more closely aligned to our Mother’s Day, England observed “Mothering Sunday”, or the “Mid-Lent-Sunday, on the fourth Sunday in Lent..During this time many of the England’s poor worked as servants for the wealthy. On Mothering Sunday the servants would have the day off and were encouraged to return home and spend the day with their mothers. A special cake, called the mothering cake, was often brought along to provide a festive touch.
With time, as Christianity spread throughout Europe the celebration changed to honor the “Mother Church” – the spiritual power that gave them life and protected them from harm and eventually the church festival blended with the Mothering Sunday celebration .
In the United States, Anna M. Jarvis (1864-1948) is credited with bringing in the celebration of Mother’s day. In the United States Mother’s Day was first suggested in 1872 by Julia Ward Howe (who wrote the words to the Battle hymn of the Republic) as a day dedicated to peace.
In 1907 Ana Jarvis, from Philadelphia, began a campaign to establish a national Mother’s Day. Ms. Jarvis persuaded her mother’s church in Grafton, West Virginia to celebrate Mother’s Day on the second anniversary of her mother’s death, the 2nd Sunday of May. By the next year Mother’s Day was also celebrated in Philadelphia.
Ms. Jarvis and her supporters began to write to ministers, businessman, and politicians in their quest to establish a national Mother’s Day. It was successful as by 1911 Mother’s Day was celebrated in almost every state. President Woodrow Wilson, in 1914, made the official announcement proclaiming Mother’s Day as a national holiday that was to be held each year on the 2nd Sunday of May.
While many countries of the world celebrate their own Mother’s Day at different times throughout the year, there are some countries such as Denmark, Finland, Italy, Turkey, Australia, and Belgium which also celebrate Mother’s Day on the second Sunday of May.
Mothers day in many languages:

Albanian   Dita e Nns
Arabic   Eid Al-Omm
Armenian   Mayrutyan or
Bengali   Shubo Matri Dibosh
Bosnian   dan majki
Chinese   mu qin ji
Czech   Den Matek
Danish   Mors dag
Dutch   Moederdag
German   Muttertag
Estonian   Emadepev
Dari   Ruz-e Madar
Finnish   itienpiv
French   Fte des mres
Hebrew   Yom ha-em
Hindi   Matru din
Croatian   Majcin dan
Hungarian   Anyk napja
Irish   L na Mhithair
Icelandic   Mradagur
Indonesian   Hari Ibu
Lithuanian   Festa della mamma
Japanese   Haha no Hi
Korean   Oboi Nal
Latvian   Mates diena
Malay   Hari Ibu
Maltese   Jum l-Omm
Montenegrin   Dan majki
Norwegian   Morsdag
Persian   Rouz-e Maadar
Polish   Dzien Matki
Portuguese   Dia da Me
Romanian   Ziua mamei
Spanish   Da de la Madre
Slovak   Den matiek
Slovenian   Materinski dan
Swedish   Mors dag
Swahili   Liepstacoq Bua
Tagalog   Araw ng mga Ina/Nanay
Tamil   Annaiyar Dhinam
Turkish   Anneler gn
Welsh   Sul y Mamau

Sunflower Frame

What you need:
• paper
• something to color with
• scissors
• glue
• favorite picture
• yellow tissue paper
• green tissue paper

What you do:
• Print out the template.
  •Cut out the template pieces.
  • Glue the flower and leaves onto the stem.  You can glue both onto a piece of     white paper if that makes it easier to hang up later.
  • Glue picture into center of the sunflower.
  • Glue balled up pieces of yellow tissue paper onto the petals.
  • Glue balled up pieces of green tissue paper onto the leaves.

Sunflower Template

May Day Basket

What you need:
• Construction Paper
• Cellophane Tape
• Home-Made Flowers
• Scissors

What you do:
• Cut a triangle shape out of bright colored construction paper. Make the point flat. Roll the triangle into a cone shape and tape the 2 sides together. Trim off any extra paper around the top of the cone to make it even.
• Cut a strip of construction paper that is approximately 12-inches long by 2-inches wide. Tape this strip onto the top of your cone to make a handle.
• Now you can fill the basket with flowers and/or treats. You can make home-made flowers to fill your basket.
• Once your May Day cone basket is done, try to hang it on your neighbor’s doorknob without getting caught!

Autism Awareness Day

On the evenings of April 1 and 2, 2011, prominent buildings across North America and the world — including the Empire State Building in New York City and the CN Tower in Toronto, Canada — will turn their lights blue to raise awareness for autism and to commemorate World Autism Awareness Day on Saturday, April 2.
Autism is a complex neurological disorder that typically lasts throughout a persons lifetime. It is part of a group of disorders known as autism disorders (ASD)
It is estimated that as many as 67 million individuals are affected by autism, making it more common in most countries than pediatric cancer, diabetes, and AIDS combined.
It  occurs in all racial, ethnic, and social groups and is four times more likely to strike boys than girls. Autism impairs a persons ability to communicate and relate to others. It is also associated with rigid routines and repetitive behaviors, such as obsessively arranging objects or following very specific routines. Symptoms can range from very mild to quite severe. All these disorders are characterized by varying degrees of impairment in communication skills and social abilities, and also by repetitive behaviors.
Autism spectrum disorders can usually be reliably diagnosed by age 3, while first diagnosis usually takes place around 18-24 months.
Parents are usually the first to notice unusual behaviors in their child or their child’s failure to reach appropriate developmental milestones. Some parents describe a child seemed different from birth, while others describe a child who was developing normally and then lost skills. Pediatricians may initially dismiss signs of autism, thinking a child will “catch up”, and may advise parents to “wait and see”. New research shows that when parents suspect something is wrong with their child, they are usually correct. If you have concerns about your child’s development, don’t wait: speak to your pediatrician about getting your child screened for autism.
Early behavioral intervention can result in significant improvements.
Although parents may have concerns about labeling a toddler as “autistic”, the earlier a diagnosis is given, the earlier interventions can begin. Currently, there are no effective means to prevent autism, no single effective treatment, and no known cure.
Research indicates, that early behavioral intervention for at least two years during the preschool years can result in significant improvements in IQ and language ability for many young children with autism spectrum disorders. As soon as autism is diagnosed, behavioral intervention should begin. Effective programs focus on developing communication, social, and cognitive skills.
In many countries autism is not a recognized disorder and diagnosis can be difficult. Countries must take a commitment to building capacity for early recognition by raising awareness. Screening methods for detection of at-risk children are available for toddlers as young as 18 months of age. Such screening can occur during a regular well-baby check up.
The most effective treatments are early, evidence-based  behavioral interventions. Many children also benefit from speech-language therapy and occupational therapy.
Red Flags of Autism:
• No big smiles or other warm, joyful expressions by six months or thereafter
• No back-and-forth sharing of sounds, smiles, or other facial expressions by nine months or thereafter
• No babbling by 12 months
• No back-and-forth gestures, such as pointing, showing, reaching, or waving by 12 months
• No words by 16 months
• No two-word meaningful phrases (without imitating or repeating) by 24 months
• No response when the child’s name is called by 10 months
• Any loss of speech, babbling or social skills at any age.

April Fools’ Day

April Fools’ Day, sometimes called All Fools’ Day, is one of the most light-hearted days of the year. Its origins are uncertain. Some see it as a celebration related to the turn of the seasons, while others believe it stems from the adoption of a new calendar.
New Year’s Day Moves
Ancient cultures, including those of the Romans and Hindus, celebrated New Year’s Day on or around April 1. It closely follows the vernal equinox (March 20th or March 21st.) In medieval times, much of Europe celebrated March 25, the Feast of Annunciation, as the beginning of the new year.
In 1582, Pope Gregory XIII ordered a new calendar (the Gregorian Calendar) to replace the old Julian Calendar. The new calendar called for New Year’s Day to be celebrated Jan. 1. That year, France adopted the reformed calendar and shifted New Year’s day to Jan. 1. According to a popular explanation, many people either refused to accept the new date, or did not learn about it, and continued to celebrate New Year’s Day on April 1. Other people began to make fun of these traditionalists, sending them on “fool’s errands” or trying to trick them into believing something false. Eventually, the practice spread throughout Europe.
Problems With This Explanation
There are at least two difficulties with this explanation. The first is that it doesn’t fully account for the
spread of April Fools’ Day to other European countries. The Gregorian calendar was not adopted by England until 1752, for example, but April Fools’ Day was already well established there by that point. The second is that we have no direct historical evidence for this explanation, only conjecture, and that conjecture appears to have been made more recently.
Constantine and Kugel
Another explanation of the origins of April Fools’ Day was provided by Joseph Boskin, a professor of history at Boston University. He explained that the practice began during the reign of Constantine, when a group of court jesters and fools told the Roman emperor that they could do a better job of running the empire. Constantine, amused, allowed a jester named Kugel to be king for one day. Kugel passed an edict calling for absurdity on that day, and the custom became an annual event.
“In a way,” explained Prof. Boskin, “it was a very serious day. In those times fools were really wise men. It was the role of jesters to put things in perspective with humor.”
This explanation was brought to the public’s attention in an Associated Press article printed by many newspapers in 1983. There was only one catch: Boskin made the whole thing up. It took a couple of weeks for the AP to realize that they’d been victims of an April Fools’ joke themselves.
Spring Fever
It is worth noting that many different cultures have had days of foolishness around the start of April, give or take a couple of weeks. The Romans had a festival named Hilaria on March 25, rejoicing in the resurrection of Attis. The Hindu calendar has Holi, and the Jewish calendar has Purim. Perhaps there’s something about the time of year, with its turn from winter to spring, that lends itself to lighthearted celebrations.
Observances Around the World
April Fools’ Day is observed throughout the Western world. Practices include sending someone on a “fool’s errand,” looking for things that don’t exist; playing pranks; and trying to get people to believe ridiculous things.
The French call April 1 Poisson d’Avril, or “April Fish.” French children sometimes tape a picture of a fish on the back of their schoolmates, crying “Poisson d’Avril” when the prank is discovered.

World Water Day

World Water Day History
The United Nations General Assembly is announced ‘World Water Day’ on March 22, 1993. World Water Day is celebrated every year on March 22. ‘World Water day’ proposed in 1992 in Agenda 21 of United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED) in Rio-de-Janeiro, Brazil.
World Water Day is started in 1993. The United Nations called the member of nations to dedicated World Water Day. UN advices and support real activities with their countries. Every year, one country of UN membership, concerned in water issues get the guide in helping and organizing global activities for World Water Day.
The United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs is organizing the World Water Day 2005. It is called ‘United Nations International Decade for Action for Water’, and also called to as the ‘Water for Life Decade 2005-2015’.
UNESCO organized World Water Day in 2006. The slogan is ‘Water and Culture’. FAO organized World Water Day in 2007. The slogan is ‘Coping with Water Scarcity’. Guardian Weekly published a special feature on ‘World Water Day’ on March 21, 2008.
World Water Day
Coordinated by UNEP. The communication and visual identity campaign is by FAO WATER, the FAO Water section.
World Water Day is a global day of ceremony and action to illustrate notice to the position that water plays in our world and lives. The United Nations General Assembly chosen the first World Water Day in 1992 to focus on dangerous irrigation issues for developed countries. United Nations and the international society respect the day and attention an exacting theme on water every year on March 22.
The World Water Crisis:

  • There are over 1 billion people across the world; they did not have pure water.
  • Water-related virus is the primary cause of fatality in the world.
  • There are many children died with water-related virus.
    Take Action:
  • Limited water is use at your home.
  • Offer your coffee or soda money, or host a water walk.
  • Send a document to your friends at least five about World Water Day.
  • Educate your neighbors about the global water crisis.
  • Conduct a water walk at your school or office.

World Water Day 2012 Theme: “Water and Food Security”.

2012 Water Day Activities and Events:
Bulgaria
• Clean Rivers for the Clean Seas
Canada
•World Water Week
France
• Journée départementale de l’eau
Ghana
• Rural Access to Clean Water Conference
Malaysia
• World Water Day Celebration
Netherlands
• Wandelen voor Water
Romania
• “The Miracle of Water”
• International Contest “Water and Food Security”
• Air & Water components of the environment conference
Russian Federation
• Urban Water Management
United States
• World Water Day Festival
• Silicon Valley Water Conservation Awards
• Water Conservation Showcase: Saving Water in the Built Environment
• World Water Week Public Lecture
• Run Away with Cirque du Soleil at the Springs Preserve – A ONE DROP World Water Day Event

Water Day Crafts from Kids Creative Arts:

Rain Art

Rainstick

Shoebox Aquarium

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St. Patrick’s Day

The Legend of St. Patrick.

Patrick was born in Britain in the year 387. His real name is Maewyn Succat. The name St. Patrick was given to him later in life by Pope Celestine. His parents, Calphurnius and Conchessa belonged to a high ranking Roman family. St. Patrick recorded most of the history of his life and his spiritual writings in the “Confessio” (Confession). St. Patrick also wrote letters to Coroticus. In this letter, he criticized a raid on Ireland conducted by Coroticus, a British chieftain. Several of Patrick’s converts were killed during the raid. The letter also shows St.Patrick’s resentment of the scornful attitude of British clergymen and nobility toward the Irish.
When he was 16, he was captured by pagan Irish raiders and sold into slavery to a chieftain named Meliuc in Antrim , Ireland. He spent his teen years and time alone as a shepard to tend to his master’s sheep. During this time, his spirituality awakened and his belief in God became strong. He would pray many times in a day. After 6 years being in slavery, he had a dream that he would find a ship to take him to freedom. He escaped to follow his dream. He had to travel about 200 miles before he found a ship ready to set sail.

He managed to return to his family and home. Although Patrick was born a British, he considered himself an Irish because it was in Ireland that he discovered God. He had another vision. This vision would take him back to Ireland to preach the Gospel later. After his escape, he visited the St. Martin’s monastry at Tours. He also visited the island sanctuary of Lerins. He placed himself under the guidance of a bishop named, St. Germain (Germanus). Patrick was promoted to priesthood later. He stayed in Britain for eighteen years. During those years, he was still haunted by memories of Ireland and would often speak of his experiences in Ireland with St. Germain. The Bishop, St. Germain recommended Patrick to the pope. Patrick requested to be sent to Ireland but was denied. Palladius was chosen instead. When Palladius died, Patrick was chosen to be sent to Ireland. He was called to Rome and made a Bishop by Pope Celestine in 432 before he went on his mission to Ireland. It was during that occasion that the name “Patercius” or “Patritius” was given to him. The name comes from two Latin words, “pater civium” meaning “the father of his people”.
He suffered many trials as a missionary in Ireland. St. Patrick was imprisoned by the Druids but managed to escape. There are also many legends which talks about the miracles and magical fights between him and the Druids. One of which is when he was confronted by a chieftain named Dichu. Dichu drew his sword to kill Patrick but could not do so because his arm became rigid until he declared himself obedient to St. Patrick. Dichu was overwhelmed by the miracle that he made a gift of a large sabhall (barn). This was the first sanctuary dedicated by St. Patrick.
Another legend St. Patrick is most known for is driving the snakes from Ireland. Some tales tell that he stood on a hill and used a wooden staff to drive the snakes into the sea and banished them forever from Ireland. Another legend says that the snake resisted. St. Patrick then tricked it into entering a small box and cast it into the sea. It is true that Ireland has no snakes.
However, he managed to win favor with the local kings later. He spent the next 28 years traveling across the countryside to spread the word of God. He could do this easily as he was fluent with the Celtic language. He succeeded in converting almost the entire population of the island.
Legend has it that St. Patrick would use the shamrock to explain the Trinity – Father, Son and Holy Spirit. The word “shamrock” comes from the Gaelic word “seamrog” (In irish, it means “summer plant”) meaning “trefoil” (three leafed) or “little clover”. In Arabia, it is called shamrakh. It was a sacred emblem in Iran and to the Persian triads. It is also a sacred plant among the Druids. Shamrock is the national flower of Ireland. Many Irish people wear a shamrock on St. Patrick’s Day. It is not the Irish national emblem. The harp has that honor. This explains the color green and shamrocks on St. Patrick’s Day. Today, if you do not wear green on St. Patrick’s Day, you will get pinched !!
St. Patrick died at Saul, Downpatrick, Ireland, on the 17 March, 461 A.D at the age of 76. He is believed to be buried in Downpatrick, County Down. This is why we celebrate St. Patrick’s Day on the seventeenth of March. St. Patrick is the patron saint of Ireland.
The first St. Patrick’s Day celebration in the United States was held in Boston in 1737. The largest St. Patrick’s Day parade is in New York City.

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Macaroni Jewelry

Macaroni crafts are great activities for children.  On a rainy day or during “down time,” kids can work on a number of different projects.  Making jewelry out of macaroni can be a really fun activity for kids and their parents. 
Macaroni bead necklace can be given to friends or relatives as a cute little gift.

 

What you need:
• Tape
• Food Colouring
• String
• Scissors
• Rubbing alcohol
• Measuring cups
• Spoon

What you do:
1. Pour ¼ cup of rubbing alcohol into a 12 to 16 oz cup and add anywhere from 5 to 15 drops of food colouring.
2. Add macaroni into the cup. Stir until all the colour is absorbed.
3. Spoon the macaroni onto a paper towel and let it dry.
4. Once the macaroni is dry, the jewellery making is ready to begin.
5. Cut the string at the desired length. Wrap one end of the string with tape so that sliding macaroni onto the string will be a little easier.
6. Slide a piece of macaroni all the way to the end of the string and tie a knot around it. This will help prevent other macaroni from sliding off the end.
7.  Continue to add macaroni until the string is full.
8.  Tie each end of the string together to complete the necklace.