Simple Tree Skirt

Simple Tree Skirt

What you need:
• Felt, 60 square inches (about 2 yards)
• 2 bulldog clips
• String
• Tailor’s chalk
• Small plate
• Scissors

What you do:
1. Fold the felt in half to create a triangle. Fold the triangle in half to create another smaller triangle.
2. Use the bulldog clip to attach one end of a long string to the folded corner of the fabric. Use the other bulldog clip to secure the other end of the string to a piece of tailor’s chalk. Holding the string taut, swing your “compass” from edge to edge in a quarter-circle, drawing an arc with the chalk.
3. With the fabric still folded and using the small plate as a guide, trace an arc onto the folded, 90-degree corner of the felt. Leave it folded, and use scissors to cut along the trace marks.
4. Unfold the felt halfway, and cut a slit along one of the folds from the edge of the circle cutout in the middle to the edge of the felt.

Paper Snowflakes

Paper Snowflakes

What you need:
 • Paper
• Scissors

What you do:
• Start with an 8.5″ x 11″ sheet of paper. Fold one corner of the piece of paper down.
• Cut off the bottom portion to make a triangle.
• Temporarily bring the two corners of the base of the triangle together to find the center point of the longest side.
• Make a small crease at the center point.
• We’re now going to use the center point to divide the triangle into three equal parts. Fold the right corner in at a 60° angle. Then fold the left corner in back at a 60° angle.
• Your paper should look like the illustration at right. Now fold the paper in half as shown.
• Cut off the upper portion along the horizontal line.
• This triangle will be 1/12th of your snowflake. Use a pencil to draw a design on the triangle. The unopened side will be the backbone of the snowflake. Do not draw any lines that cut through the triangle.
• Use scissors to carefully cut away the unwanted area.
• Carefully unfold your snowflake and flatten it out with your fingers.
• Now experiment with different designs and see what you come up with.

 

 

Picture Frame

Picture Frame

What you need:
• Cardboard
• Scissors
• Glue
• Paper
• Wire for hanging

What you do:
• Decide on the size you want the frame to be based on your image.
• Cut out the center as well to make it the exact size you want.
• Lay the frame down on your paper.
• Draw a line one inch outside the frame and one inch inside the frame.
• Draw the lines of the frame on the paper too.
• Cut it all out.
• Draw a line thru the outside corner (to make a right triangle) in each corner and cut those corners off.
• Draw a line thru the inside corners to where the frame begins make two 45 degree angles. Cut along those lines.
• Fold all the inside pieces inside.
• Put the frame on the paper, the inside flaps inside. Fold the outside flaps up around the cardboard.
• Glue the paper down with the glue to the cardboard.
• Tape your print to the back of the frame.
• Hang your picture.

Turkey Craft

Turkey Craft

What you need:
Paper Plate 
• Paint
• Paint Brush
• Construction Paper
• Pen
• Scissors
• Craft Glue
• Wiggle Eyes
What you do:
Paint the back of the paper plate brown.
Trace your hand on one half of 3 or 4 sheets of paper. Fold the paper in half.
• Cut out the handprint through both thicknesses of paper. This will leave you with 6 to 8 handprints. Set them aside.
Trace your foot on a brown piece of construction paper.
•  Cut out the footprint. Set it aside.
Using scrap construction paper, cut out a beak and a waddle for your turkey. Set these aside.
Glue the handprints onto the unpainted side of the paper plate, poking up over the top edge.Your fingers will look like the turkey’s feathers.
Glue your footprint/shoe print toe side down onto the front, center of the painted plate.
• Glue on the beak and waddle that you cut out.
• Glue on a pair of wiggle eyes.
• Your turkey is now done!

Handy Wreath

Handy Thanksgiving

What you need:
• Construction Paper
• Scissors
• Glue
• Pencil

What you do:
• Lay your hand down, fingers apart, and trace around it on several different colors. 
• Cut out a set of twelve hands.
• Tilt each paper hand slightly and arrange the group to form a wreath shape.
• Glue.
• Put the wreath on a wall or door near the table, and be thankful.

Leaf Prints

Leaf Prints

What you need:
Leaves
• Sketch paper or construction paper
• Acrylic paint
• Paint brushes

What you do:
• Collect leaves of various shapes and sizes.
• Cover your work area with a mat or with newspapers. Prepare different colors of paint on your palette.
• Position a leaf with its under-side facing up and paint on its entire surface.
• Press the painted leaf onto sketch paper or construction paper.
• Remove the leaf to reveal a beautiful leaf print.
• Repeat the process using different colors and other leaf shapes.
• Repeat the process using different colors and other leaf shapes.
• Make overlapping leaf prints to create a colorful leaf collage.

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Leaf Preservation

Leaf preservation

What you need:
• Old phone book
• Collection of colorful leaves, grasses, flowers, herbs

What you do:
• Take a nature walk with on a clear, dry day.
• Collect any attractive flowers, leaves, grasses, and herbs.
• At home, separate each stalk or blossom, and place between the pages of the phone book. Use a different page for each specimen, spacing them well apart from each other.
• Place the phone book in a cool, dry place for a week to ten days. Your leaves will then be totally dry and ready for use.
• Your phone book/leaf press can be used over and over again. Flowers may be stored in them for several months.

Fall Button Branch

Fall button branch

What you need:
• canvas
• branch
• buttons
• glue

What you do:
1. Glue your branch onto your canvas. I put a very heavy book on top of the branch while it dried to keep it flat to the canvas.
2. Once the branch is glued and dried, start gluing your beautiful buttons on the smaller branches to look like leaves on a tree. Allow to dry.
3. You’re going to want to display this beautiful masterpiece!

Healthy Snacks

Healthy snacks

Snacking can be good for kids. In fact, since young kids can only eat small portions, snacks are an important part of their daily diets. What matters most is the quality of those snacks. When chosen well, snacks can go a long way towards improving a child’s nutritional status.
Keep it Simple
Often, the very best snacks are the simplest ones. Fresh fruit, veggies, and whole grain crackers are all good choices. In general, the less processed a food is, the better it is for your body. Happily, these foods are often the easiest to get and the most convenient to serve. It doesn’t get much easier than peeling a banana. Think basics.
Making Better Choices
To avoid unhealthy foods, become a label reader. Take a pass on snacks that contain trans fats. If the label says the product contains hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated oils, don’t buy it. Fat is not inherently unhealthy, but you do need to get fat from healthy sources, such as olive oil, sunflower oil, or canola oil.
Many foods that kids are accustomed to eating are loaded with sugar and processed flour. When you find whole grain substitutions for the processed stuff, most kids won’t even notice the difference in taste, but whole grains are much healthier. Sugary treats are fine occasionally, but for everyday snacking, choose naturally sweet fresh fruit to satisfy their cravings. Fruit salad, unsweetened applesauce, raisins, peanut butter and all-fruit jam on whole wheat toast are pleasing to most kids and are things that parents can feel good about serving. Low fat dairy products such as yogurt, some cheeses, or vegetable dips are also great snacking choices.

Twig Trivet

Twig Trivet

What you need:
•Lots of Sticks
• Corrugated cardboard
• Natural jute, 4-ply, #72 (optional)
• Pruning shears or sharp craft knife
• Ruler
• Pencil
• Scissors
• Waxed paper
• Craft stick
• Tacky glue

What you do:
Step 1: Ask an adult to help you use pruning shears (or a sharp craft knife) to cut the sticks into three-inch lengths. Use sticks that are as straight as possible. You will need about 25 to 30 pieces.
Step 2: Measure and cut a piece of cardboard into a 6-inch square.
Step 3: Place the cardboard square onto waxed paper. Scoop glue from bottle with the craft stick and spread glue in a thick layer over entire cardboard surface.
Step 4: Lay the sticks in a parquet pattern (see photograph, below). Place the sticks as close to each other as possible. Let glue dry completely.
Step 5: Squeeze a thick line of glue around the outside edge of the trivet. Starting in the center of a side, place the jute in the glue and press firmly to the edge of the trivet.When you reach the beginning of the jute, overlap the ends slightly. Let the glue dry

Pumpkin Lantern

Pumpkin Lantern Cover

What you need:
• 8.5×11 orange construction paper
• string or ribbon
• a hole puncher
• a sticker or tape

What you do:
• Cut your construction paper into strips that are equal in length and width.
• Stack the papers and punch holes through the top and bottom of each strip.
• String the strips on your piece of string or ribbon. Seal the string with a piece of tape or sticker.
• String through the top holes.
• Pull the string tight until the paper bows out. Tie off the top (make sort of a bow/messy knot. It just needs to be big enough that the string doesn’t go back through the paper).
• Fan out the strips until you have created a sphere shape.
• Hang your pumpkin.

Statue of Liberty

Statue of liberty

On July 4, 1884 France presented the United States with an incredible birthday gift: the Statue of Liberty! Without its pedestal it’s as tall as a 15-story building. She represents the United States. But the world-famous Statue of Liberty standing in New York Harbor was built in France. The statue was presented to the U.S., taken apart, shipped across the Atlantic Ocean in crates, and rebuilt in the U.S. It was France’s gift to the American people.
It all started at dinner one night near Paris in 1865. A group of Frenchmen were discussing their dictator-like emperor and the democratic government of the U.S. They decided to build a monument to American freedom—and perhaps even strengthen French demands for democracy in their own country. At that dinner was the sculptor Frédéric-Auguste Bartholdi (bar-TOLE-dee). He imagined a statue of a woman holding a torch burning with the light of freedom.
The Statue of Liberty, known officially as “Liberty Enlightening the World,” was designed by French sculptor Frederic Auguste Bartholdi and funded completely through donations from the French people.
After Bartholdi finalized the design in miniature, the statue itself was created using wooden molds, a copper shell, and an iron structure designed by Gustave Eiffel, who later built the Eiffel Tower.
On July 4, 1884, the 151-foot-tall, 225-ton Statue of Liberty was delivered to the American Ambassador in Paris. In order to transport Lady Liberty to New York, the statue was dismantled into 300 pieces and packed into 214 wooden crates.
Unfortunately, a lack of funds in the United States delayed the building of the pedestal. Fund-raising efforts stalled until Joseph Pulitzer, publisher of “The World” newspaper and noted for the Pulitzer Prize, decided to use his newspaper to push Americans to donate. The Statue was finally re-assembled on her new pedestal and dedicated on October 28, 1886.
The Statue of Liberty celebrates her birthday on October 28th in honor of the day she was officially accepted by the president of the United States in 1886.
Fast Facts
• Engineer Gustave Eiffel, who would later design the Eiffel Tower in Paris, designed Liberty’s “spine.” Inside the statue four huge iron columns support a metal framework that holds the thin copper skin.
• Frédéric-Auguste Bartholdi knew he wanted to build a giant copper goddess; he used his mother as the model.
• The statue—151 feet, 1 inch (46 meters, 2.5 centimeters) tall—was the tallest structure in the U.S. at that time.
• The arm holding the torch measures 46 feet (14 meters); the index finger, 8 feet (2.4 meters); the nose, nearly 5 feet (1.5 meters).
• The statue is covered in 300 sheets of coin-thin copper. They were hammered into different shapes and riveted together.
•The statue sways 3 inches (7.62 centimeters) in the wind; the torch sways 5 inches (12.7 centimeters).
• Visitors climb 354 steps (22 stories) to look out from 25 windows in the crown.
• Seven rays in the crown represent the Earth’s seven seas and seven continents.