Labor Day History

Labor Day, the first Monday in September, is a creation of the labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of American workers. It constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of our country.
Founder of Labor Day
More than 100 years after the first Labor Day observance, there is still some doubt as to who first proposed the holiday for workers.
Some records show that Peter J. McGuire, general secretary of the Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners and a cofounder of the American Federation of Labor, was first in suggesting a day to honor those “who from rude nature have delved and carved all the grandeur we behold.”
But Peter McGuire’s place in Labor Day history has not gone unchallenged. Many believe that Matthew Maguire, a machinist, not Peter McGuire, founded the holiday. Recent research seems to support the contention that Matthew Maguire, later the secretary of Local 344 of the International Association of Machinists in Paterson, N.J., proposed the holiday in 1882 while serving as secretary of the Central Labor Union in New York. What is clear is that the Central Labor Union adopted a Labor Day proposal and appointed a committee to plan a demonstration and picnic.
The First Labor Day
On September 5, 1882 the first Labor Day parade was held in New York City. Twenty thousand workers marched in a parade up Broadway. They carried banners that read “LABOR CREATES ALL WEALTH,” and “EIGHT HOURS FOR WORK, EIGHT HOURS FOR REST, EIGHT HOURS FOR RECREATION!” After the parade there were picnics all around the city. Workers and celebrants ate Irish stew, homemade bread and apple pie. At night, fireworks were set off. The Central Labor Union held its second Labor Day holiday just a year later, on September 5, 1883.

Print Friendly
Be Sociable, Share!

Comments

  1. You need more fish recipes on the site.

  2. Love your posts.

  3. Love your site. So much cool information.

  4. SpaplySymnSef says:

    Thanks.

  5. Interesting info.

  6. Great article.

  7. Great post.

  8. Great post.

  9. Thank you.

  10. Thanks.

  11. Harry Jablon says:

    Some really superb articles on this site, thanks for contribution.

Trackbacks

  1. … [Trackback]…

    [...] Read More here: kidscreativearts.com/?p=1760 [...]…

Speak Your Mind

*