Patriotic Wind Sock

Patriotic windsock copy

What you need:
• Empty Bread Crumb Container
• Blue and white construction paper
• Star shaped cookie cutter
• Pencil
• Glue
• White and Red Crepe Paper Streamers
• Scissors
• String

What you do:
• Cut the bottom off the Bread Crumb Container.
• Cover the container with the blue construction paper.
• Trace the stars on the white construction paper. Cut them out.
• Glue the stars to the container.
• Cut some red and white crepe paper streamers and glue them to the bottom of the container.
• Punch 4 holes on the top of the container.
• Cut two pieces of the string about a foot long.
• Tie the string to the container.
• Tie a longer piece of string to the shorter pieces.
• Hang your Patriotic Wind sock from your window or porch.

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Picture Frame

Picture Frame

What you need:
• Cardboard
• Scissors
• Glue
• Paper
• Wire for hanging

What you do:
• Decide on the size you want the frame to be based on your image.
• Cut out the center as well to make it the exact size you want.
• Lay the frame down on your paper.
• Draw a line one inch outside the frame and one inch inside the frame.
• Draw the lines of the frame on the paper too.
• Cut it all out.
• Draw a line thru the outside corner (to make a right triangle) in each corner and cut those corners off.
• Draw a line thru the inside corners to where the frame begins make two 45 degree angles. Cut along those lines.
• Fold all the inside pieces inside.
• Put the frame on the paper, the inside flaps inside. Fold the outside flaps up around the cardboard.
• Glue the paper down with the glue to the cardboard.
• Tape your print to the back of the frame.
• Hang your picture.

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Memorial Day

memorial day cover

Memorial Day is more than just a three-day weekend and a chance to get the year’s first sunburn.
Memorial Day was a response to the unprecedented carnage of the Civil War, in which some 620,000 soldiers on both sides died. The loss of life and its effect on communities throughout the North and South led to spontaneous commemorations of the dead:
 In 1864, women from Boalsburg, Pennsylvania, put flowers on the graves of their dead from the just-fought Battle of Gettysburg. The next year, a group of women decorated the graves of soldiers buried in a Vicksburg, Mississippi, cemetery.
 In April 1866, women from Columbus, Mississippi, laid flowers on the graves of both Union and Confederate soldiers. It was recognized at the time as an act of healing regional wounds. In the same month, up in Carbondale, Illinois, 219 Civil War veterans marched through town in memory of the fallen to Woodlawn Cemetery, where Union hero Maj. Gen. John A. Logan delivered the principal address. The ceremony gave Carbondale its claim to the first organized, community-wide Memorial Day observance.
Waterloo, New York., began holding an annual community service on May 5, 1866. Although many towns claimed the title, it was Waterloo that won congressional recognition as the “birthplace of Memorial Day.”
Three years after the Civil War ended, on May 5, 1868, the head of the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) established Decoration Day as a time for the nation to decorate the graves of the war dead with flowers. Maj. Gen. John A. Logan declared that Decoration Day should be observed on May 30. This date was chosen because flowers would be in bloom all over the country.
From the practice of decorating graves with flowers, wreaths and flags, the holiday was long known as Decoration Day. The name Memorial Day goes back to 1882, but the older name didn’t disappear until after World War II. Federal law declared “Memorial Day” the official name in 1967.
In 1915, inspired by the poem “In Flanders Fields,” Moina Michael replied with her own poem.

We cherish too, the Poppy red
That grows on fields where valor led,
It seems to signal to the skies
That blood of heroes never dies.

She then came up with an idea of wearing red poppies on Memorial day in honor of those who died serving the nation during war. She was the first to wear one, and sold poppies to her friends and co-workers with the money going to benefit servicemen in need.
Since the late 1950′s on the Thursday just before the Memorial day, around 1200 soldiers of the 3d U.S. Infantry place small American flags at each of the more than 260,000 gravestones at Arlington National Cemetery. They then patrol 24 hours a day during the weekend to ensure that each flag remains standing. In 1951, the Boy Scouts and Cub Scouts of St. Louis began placing flags on the 150,000 graves at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery as an annual Good Turn, a practice that continues to this day.

In 2000, Congress established a National Moment of Remembrance, which asks Americans to pause for one minute at 3 p.m. in an act of national unity. The time was chosen because 3 p.m. “is the time when most Americans are enjoying their freedoms on the national holiday.”

And in 2004, Washington D.C. held its first Memorial Day parade in over 60 years.

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